Saturday, 28 October 2017

MIMS. Can doctors advise us about the dangers of pharmaceutical drugs that are not yet known?

MIMS is one of the 'bibles' used by conventional doctors. They rely on it for advice about the dangers of the pharmaceutical drugs they prescribe. I receive their regular (monthly?) updates, and a few days ago they published a bulletin that came up with an enormous amount of new advice. This is just one update for doctors. I have copied the new advice below, but let me first ask several questions.
  1. Conventional medicine routinely peddles dangerous drugs, but this regular change of advice suggests that it does not know exactly what the dangers are! So does conventional medicine really know just how dangerous pharmaceutical drugs and vaccines are?
  2. And how do doctor's retain all this information. Remember this is just one month's new or revised guidance on the drugs mentioned. So can patients be sure that their doctor can retain and recall all this information when they are prescribing pharmaceutical drugs?
So this is the new advice. Don't worry if you do not understand exactly what this means - the point is that these drugs have been prescribed to patients for years, during which time these warnings were not known about.

     Adjust gabapentin dose to avoid respiratory depression, MHRA advises
Prescribers may need to adjust the dose of gabapentin in patients at risk of respiratory depression, including those taking CNS depressants and elderly people.

     Cows' milk allergy warning over methylprednisolone use
Lactose-containing methylprednisolone preparations should not be used in patients with cows' milk allergy, the MHRA has advised prescribers.

     Risk of serious skin reactions with anaemia drugs
Severe cutaneous adverse reactions can occur in patients treated with erythropoietins, the manufacturers have warned in a letter to healthcare professionals.

     Clozapine prescribers reminded of intestinal obstruction risk
Clozapine can impair intestinal peristalsis, leading in very rare cases to potentially fatal intestinal obstruction, faecal impaction, and paralytic ileus.

     Advise women to take combined contraceptive pills continuously, says family planning expert
The 21/7 contraceptive pill regimen is 'outdated' and taking combined oral contraceptives without a 7-day break is the '21st century way to take the pill', according to Professor John Guillebaud.

So perhaps patients should routinely ask their doctors to be ENTIRELY sure that they know about ALL the contraindications and side effects of the drugs they want US to take, and that they also know about all the new contraindications and side effects that MIMS will announce next month, the month after, and the years to come. Impossible, of course.

YET WITHOUT THAT ASSURANCE WE CANNOT BE ENTIRELY CONFIDENT THAT THE PHARMACEUTICAL DRUGS OR VACCINES OUR DOCTORS PRESCRIBE FOR US ARE SAFE, OR EFFECTIVE!